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HotMela? HotMall? HotMahal? HotNagar?

Sabeer Bhatia is at it again. Generating hype, that is.
This time he's building a city, Silicon Valley to be precise, in India.
It's called Nano City and the idea is to create an environment that will foster innovation and create a Silicon Valley in India.

Well-informed readers would shrug and yawn - this has been tried umpteen times before without credible success. Paul Graham discusses the futility of it all in his essays "How to Be Silicon Valley" and Why Startups Condense in America.

But for India it's a win-win, regardless of whether Bhatia succeeds in his vision. At a minimum, India will end up with a modern development housing some universities, some companies, and rich residents with a lot of disposable income- creating a mini-economy of their own.

But Nano City? Am I the only one who is sick and tired of the Cyber-Xs and Nano-Ys? Why not give it a nice Indian name?

To get started, check out some of the more popular suffixes for city names in India. And Sabeer, if Nano City turns out to be yet another no-no-not-another-silicon-valley-wannabe, we'll be happy to share our wealth of nice Indian city names for your baby.

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