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Getting somewhere in America


 The problem with the designated driver program, it's not a desirable job, but if you ever get sucked into doing it, have fun with it. At the end of the night, drop them off at the wrong house.
- Jeff Foxworthy

Made me think about how in the 21st century, we're still trying to figure out how to get from Point 'A' to Point 'B'. Seriously, how many of you have a reasonable legal solution to this problem of getting home from the bar or a late night party- when you're buzz drunk?

How about getting to the airport? Do you really pay $90 for a cab ride after 9 pm to the SF airport from Sunnyvale? Perhaps you get a friend or spouse to drive 30 miles to the airport and back. Maybe you belong to the small minority of people who have figured out the $31 door-to-door shuttle- and can put up with it.

Well, think about how you usually drop off and pick up your car for oil-change or repairs?

The list goes on and on - think about all those times your old faithful lets you down and you're looking for a short-term alternative (no, we're not talking about bored husbands looking for a fling ;).

Hang in there dear faithful readers (readers? where? but I digress). Your prayers have been answered- see for yourself in the CrystalBall!

Pretty soon you can go from Point 'A' to Point 'B' without fuss. And it's FREE!

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