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Test Trimming: A Fable about Testing

While browsing the web randomly, I found this very cool article on the value of testing.
Says the author, Gerald M. Weinberg:
"Throughout my career, I've watched in dismay as one software manager after another falls into the trap of achieving delivery schedules by trimming tests. Some managers shortcut test work by skipping reviewing and unit testing in the middle of their project. Others pressure the testers to "test faster" at the end. And, most frequently, they just drop planned tests altogether, hoping they "get lucky."

I've written several essays about the dangers of test trimming, but nobody seems to understand, so I asked myself, "What am I doing wrong?" Perhaps I wasn't practicing what I was preaching. Perhaps I was trimming tests myself. Perhaps my writing needed more testing!

So, I wrote a story about taking shortcuts and read it to my granddaughter, Camille."

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